Chrysler Town & Country cars – Woodie Years

In the modern age, we see all stylish metallic body cars with a wide variety of colors. During 1940 -1950, Chrysler Town & Country manufactured two famous Woodie cars with a steel roof.

  1. 1942 Chrysler Town & Country (pre-war)
  2. 1948 Chrysler Town & Country (post-war)

Chrysler’s Town & Country wagon was distinguished by woodgrain paneling on the body sides and tailgate, a feature also associated with competitive wagons such as the AMC Ambassador, Buick Estate, Oldsmobile Custom Cruiser, Ford Country Squire, and the Mercury Colony Park.

1942 Chrysler Town & Country (pre-war)

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They made their debut with 4 door wagon body styles with 8 passengers. The wagon was front engine, rear wheel drive layout (FR Layout), a traditional automobile layout for most of the cars during those times.

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It used the roof of the concurrent Chrysler Imperial 4-door 8-passenger limousine, which led to a rear loading configuration with wooden double doors (also called ‘Barrel Back‘ doors) that opened out from the center beneath the fixed backlight (rear window). We are particularly drawn to the pre-war fastback sedans, which themselves played a part in replacing wood with metal. They were the first Woodie long-roofs to have an all-steel roof.

The 1942 model year Town & Country had an abbreviated production run due to the World War II. Less than one-thousand units had been produced since the vehicle’s introduction a year earlier.

1948 Chrysler Town & Country (post-war)

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During 1946 Town & Country nameplate returned with 4-door sedan and 2-door convertible. Chrysler built seven pre-production Town & Country cars of 2-door hardtop body style during the 1946 model year and went into full production during four model years later (1950).

The 1948 Chrysler Town & Country had 2-door convertible from a 4-door sedan with just very few improvements. It had the same front engine, rear wheel drive layout (FR Layout). It was quite relative to Chrysler Imperial, Chrysler Windsor, and DeSoto Custom.

The 1950 Town & Country 2-door hardtop was the last true original Woodie offering, ever, during its one-model-year production run.

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The 1950 Crosley Hot Shot is often given credit for the first production disc brakes but the Chrysler Imperial Crown actually had them first as standard equipment at the start of the 1949 model year. The Chrysler 4-wheel disc brake system was built by Auto Specialties Manufacturing Company (Ausco).

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